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W.S. Tyler To Exhibit Vibrating Screen


W.S. Tyler, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, will be exhibiting its screening, washing, pelletizing and particle analysis technologies at Agg1 2012 in booth 1912. Among other things, the company will discuss its T-Class two-bearing circular vibrating screen, which offers numerous customizable features so aggregate producers can easily design a machine to precisely screen their aggregate material to valuable specifications.

W.S. Tyler’s T-Class is built on a platform, first providing a choice of machine width, from 4 to 8 ft. (1.2 to 2.4 m), and the proper concentric shaft drive type with bearing sizes of either 120 mm to 160 mm. Producers can then choose between screen length, from 8 to 24 ft. (2.4 to 7.3 m); number of decks up to 4-1/2; and one or two shafts, depending on the application. Within these self-set parameters, the choices grow to include deck setup, feed and discharge arrangements, suspension systems, reinforcement plates, wear lining and stroke and speed combinations. The T-Class vibrating screen also allows for the use of multiple screen media types on each deck to meet unique screening requirements.

Ideal for aggregate separation and sizing, the W.S. Tyler T-Class vibrating screen can handle a top feed size of 12 in. (30.5 cm), in wet or dry applications, screening to a size that ranges from 6 in. (15.2 cm) down to 20 mesh for scalping or finer screening needs.

Standard features in the W.S. Tyler T-Class augment the heavy-duty properties of the screen. In addition to the rugged 3/8-in.-thick (1 cm) huck-bolted body design, which is free from welds that can suffer from fatigue cracking, the T-Class vibrating screen offers 90-degree top and 45-degree bottom Durabend side plates; patented angle box tensioning; single-point grease lubrication; hands-free tube housing for bearing work without come-alongs or drift pins; and the Ty-Rider mounting system, which reduces noise pollution and eliminates lateral movement of the machine.

W.S. Tyler, www.wstyler.com