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Twin Eagle Breaks Ground for New Terminal


Twin Eagle Sand Logistics has broken ground on the Permian Rail Park. The Permian Rail Park is located on the Union Pacific Railway approximately eight miles west of the city of Big Spring, Texas. The 530-acre rail park is Twin Eagle’s fifth terminal development and is centrally located to serve the Eastern side of the Permian Basin.

Phase I of the project, which will be initially used for rail-to-truck sand trans-loading services, calls for more than 33,000 ft. of track and is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2016. Twin Eagle also has Phase II plans to develop a loop track capable of supporting crude-by-rail market activity as well as infrastructure to handle trucking solutions for both crude and sand.

“The Permian Basin has demonstrated remarkable resilience in the face of a challenging price environment and will likely perform well into a recovery cycle,” said Griff Jones, Twin Eagle’s chief executive officer. “We believe the industry will continue to demand unit train terminaling infrastructure that demonstrate size and scope as they efficiently manage their supply chain. Permian Rail Park, which is supported by a sand trans-loading contract with a major E&P anchor tenant, is another terminal in our growing portfolio that serve our customers’ needs.”

Twin Eagle Sand Logistics LLC is one of the largest third-party frac sand terminal developers and operators in the country. Twin Eagle Sand Logistics terminals are strategically located in the most prolific oil and gas basins. Locations, in addition to Mission Rail, include: the Laredo Terminal located in the South Eagle Ford, the Evans Terminal located near Evans, Colo., to serve the DJ Basin, and the Powder River Basin Terminal in Douglas, Wyo. Twin Eagle’s current terminals, combined, control more than 900 rail car spaces with nearly 50,000 tons of storage capacity. In July, Mission Rail landed the largest frac sand unit train ever handled by the Union Pacific Railway, which was 140 cars in length.