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Now Incorporating Aggregates Manager
 

 

 
 


By Mark S. Kuhar and Josephine Patterson

This issue of Rock Products features nine regional reports, with information about aggregates production, construction activity and more.

For additional guidance on construction activity that impacts aggregates markets, Dodge Data & Analytics just released its 2020 Dodge Construction Outlook, a mainstay in construction industry forecasting and business planning. The report predicts that total U.S. construction starts will slip to $776 billion in 2020, a decline of 4% from the 2019 estimated level of activity.

“The recovery in construction starts that began during 2010 in the aftermath of the Great Recession is coming to an end,” stated Richard Branch, chief economist for Dodge Data & Analytics. “Easing economic growth driven by mounting trade tensions and lack of skilled labor will lead to a broad based, but orderly pullback in construction starts in 2020. After increasing 3% in 2018 construction starts dipped an estimated 1% in 2019 and will fall 4% in 2020.”

“Next year, however, will not be a repeat of what the construction industry endured during the Great Recession. Economic growth is slowing but is not anticipated to contract next year. Construction starts, therefore, will decline but the level of activity will remain close to recent highs. By major construction sector, the dollar value of starts for residential buildings will be down 6%, while starts for both nonresidential buildings and nonbuilding construction will drop 3%.”

The pattern of construction starts for more specific segments is as follows:

  • Public works construction starts will move 4% higher in 2020 with growth continuing across all project types. By and large, recent federal appropriations have kept funding for public works construction either steady or slightly higher – translating into continued growth in environmental and transportation infrastructure starts. The dollar value of single-family housing starts will be down 3% in 2020 and the number of units will also lose 5% to 765,000 (Dodge basis). Affordability issues and the tight supply of entry level homes have kept demand for homes muted and buyers on the sidelines.
  • Multifamily construction was an early leader in the recovery, stringing together eight years of growth since 2009. However, multifamily vacancy rates have moved sideways over the past year, suggesting that slower economic growth will weigh on the market in 2020. Multifamily starts are slated to drop 13% in dollars and 15% in units to 410,000 (Dodge basis).
  • The dollar value of commercial building starts will retreat 6% in 2020. The steepest declines will occur in commercial warehouses and hotels, while the decline in office construction will be cushioned by high value data center construction. Retail activity will also fall in 2020, a continuation of a trend brought about by systemic changes in the industry.
  • In 2020, institutional construction starts will essentially remain even with the 2019 level as the influence of public dollars adds stability to the outlook. Education building and health facility starts should continue to see modest growth , offset by declines in recreation and transportation buildings.
  • The dollar value of manufacturing plant construction will slip 2% in 2020 following an estimated decline of 29% in 2019. Rising trade tensions has tilted this sector to the downside with recent data, both domestic and globally, suggesting the manufacturing sector is in contraction.
  • Electric utilities/gas plants will drop 27% in 2020 following growth of 83% in 2019 as several large LNG export facilities and new wind projects broke ground.

The 2020 Dodge Construction Outlook was presented at the 81st annual Outlook Executive Conference held by Dodge Data & Analytics at the Renaissance Chicago Downtown Hotel in Chicago.

Construction Spending

Construction spending during September 2019 was estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1,293.6 billion, 0.5% (±1.0%) above the revised August estimate of $1,287.1 billion, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The September figure is 2.0% (±1.8%) below the September 2018 estimate of $1,319.7 billion.

During the first nine months of this year, construction spending amounted to $968.7 billion, 2.2% (±1.2%) below the $990.2 billion for the same period in 2018.

In September, the estimated seasonally adjusted annual rate of public construction spending was $331.9 billion, 1.5% (±1.8%) above the revised August estimate of $327.2 billion. 

Highway construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $98.0 billion, 2.6% (±4.4%) above the revised August estimate of $95.5 billion. Educational construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $78.9 billion, 3.1% (±1.8%) above the revised August estimate of $76.5 billion. 

Among the three largest public categories, spending in the first nine months of 2019 climbed 9.3% compared to the same period in 2018 for highway and street construction spending, 1.0% for educational construction and 9.1% for transportation (airports, transit, rail and port) projects.

Spending on private construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $961.7 billion, 0.2% (±0.7%) above the revised August estimate of $959.9 billion.

  • Residential construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $511.4 billion in September, 0.6% (±1.3%) above the revised August estimate of $508.4 billion.
  • Nonresidential construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $450.3 billion in September, 0.3% (±0.7%) below the revised August estimate of $451.4 billion.

Private residential construction spending increased for the month but slid 7.9% year-to-date. Single-family homebuilding rose 1.3% from August to September, the third consecutive monthly gain, but fell 8.0% year-to-date. Spending on multifamily projects declined 0.7% for the month but was 5.9% higher year-to-date.

Private nonresidential spending decreased from August to September and decreased 0.6% year-to-date. Power construction (comprising electric power generation, transmission and distribution, plus oil and gas fields and pipelines) climbed 5.5% year-to-date.

“Public construction remains one of the strongest elements of the U.S. economy,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “Spending in the water supply category surged nearly 6% in September and is up 20% on a year-over-year basis. Overall, public nonresidential construction is up nearly 7% over the past 12 months as state and local government finances enjoy their best health in more than a decade. While there were some declines on a monthly basis in certain public segments in September, year-over-year spending is up more than 6% in the highway/street category, by nearly 6% in the transportation segment and by nearly 9% in the public safety category.

“Leading indicators, including the Architecture Billings Index, continue to point toward sluggish growth or worse in private construction,” said Basu. “Public construction spending, by contrast, should remain a source of economic expansion during the months ahead, but the looming insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund must be addressed soon for momentum to persist.

Dodge Momentum Index

The Dodge Momentum Index increased 6.9% in October to 152.6 (2000=100) from the revised September reading of 142.7. The Momentum Index, issued by Dodge Data & Analytics, is a monthly measure of the first (or initial) report for nonresidential building projects in planning, which have been shown to lead construction spending for nonresidential buildings by a full year. 

October’s increase was due entirely to a recovery in institutional planning projects, which had stepped back over the previous few months. Institutional planning moved 22.8% higher in the month while commercial planning lost 0.5%.

Despite the October increase, institutional projects entering planning remain 4.3% lower on a year-over-year basis compared to October 2018. Commercial projects meanwhile are 14.3% higher than October 2018 as several mega projects have entered the early stages of planning over the last several months. The overall Momentum Index is 6.7% higher than a year ago, although its level remains below the July 2018 peak.

In October, 24 projects each with a value of $100 million or more entered planning. The leading institutional projects were the $470 million Orlando Health Hospital in Lake Mary, Fla., and a $356 million renovation project at the Rockrimmon Elementary School in Colorado Springs, Colo. The leading commercial projects were a $250 million office building in Brooklyn, N.Y., and the $188 million Spirit Airlines Headquarters in Dania Beach, Fla.


New England

The New England Region Produced 19.7 Million Metric Tons of Total Aggregates, A 5.2% Year-Over-Year Decrease.

The New England region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the New England region produced 19.7 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 5.2% decrease versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 4.3 Mt, a decrease of 8.9% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the New England region was 11.8 Mt, a decrease of 5.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Connecticut: 2.8 Mt, an increase of 3.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Maine: 1.2 Mt, an increase of 4.0% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Massachusetts: 3.9 Mt, a decrease of 19.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • New Hampshire: 1.8 Mt, an increase of 13.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Rhode Island: 681,000 metric tons, a decrease of 17.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Vermont: 1.2 Mt, an increase of 0.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the New England region was 7.8 Mt, a decrease of 4.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Connecticut: 991,000 metric tons, a decrease of 13.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Maine: 2.5 Mt, a decrease of 14.0% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Massachusetts: Data unreported for the second quarter of 2019.
  • New Hampshire: 3.2 Mt, an increase of 5.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Rhode Island: Data unreported for the second quarter of 2019.
  • Vermont: 1.1 Mt, an increase of 0.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact*

  • In Connecticut, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 57,000, a decrease of 2.6% from July 2018, and 19% less than the state’s peak in January 1990. Construction contributed $8.3 billion (3.0%) of the state’s GDP of $274 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $4.2 billion in Connecticut. Private nonresidential spending in Connecticut totaled $2 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Connecticut totaled $3.8 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Maine, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 29,500, an increase of 1.7% from July 2018, but 8% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $2.4 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $64.4 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.5 billion in Maine. Private nonresidential spending in Maine totaled $622 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $398 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Maine totaled $2.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Massachusetts, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 155,000, a decrease of 1.6% from July 2018, and 2% less than the state’s peak in April 2019. Construction contributed $21.2 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $567 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $12.6 billion in Massachusetts. Private nonresidential spending in Massachusetts totaled $10.6 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $5.7 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Massachusetts totaled $10 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In New Hampshire, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 27,900, an increase of 3.3% from July 2018, but 7% less than the state’s peak in March 2006. Construction contributed $2.6 billion (3.1%) of the state’s GDP of $84.7 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.7 billion in New Hampshire. Private nonresidential spending in New Hampshire totaled $907 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $880 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in New Hampshire totaled $1.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Rhode Island, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 20,100, an increase of 5.2% from July 2018, but 14% less than the state’s peak in January 2007. Construction contributed $2.2 billion (3.6%) of the state’s GDP of $61 billion in 2016. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, and $1.1 billion (2016) in Rhode Island. Private nonresidential spending in Rhode Island totaled $886 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $488 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Rhode Island totaled $2.8 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Vermont, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 14,600, a decrease of 3.3% from July 2018, and 17% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $1.1 billion (3.4%) of the state’s GDP of $33.7 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $800 million in Vermont. Private nonresidential spending in Vermont totaled $639 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $507 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Vermont totaled $449 million in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Connecticut

  • Of the 4,270 bridges in the state, 308, or 7.2%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is down from 376 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 46 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 162 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 421 bridges at an estimated cost of $1.6 billion.

Maine

  • Of the 2,473 bridges in the state, 325, or 13.1%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is down from 346 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 13 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 129 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 345 bridges at an estimated cost of $48.9 million.

Massachusetts

  • Of the 5,215 bridges in the state, 481, or 9.2%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is up from 446 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 61 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 612 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 4,768 bridges at an estimated cost of $9.5 billion.

New Hampshire

  • Of the 2,494 bridges in the state, 224, or 9.0%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is down from 260 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 13 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 160 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 2,444 bridges at an estimated cost of $3.7 billion.

Rhode Island

  • Of the 780 bridges in the state, 180, or 23.1%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is up from 173 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 27 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 117 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 721 bridges at an estimated cost of $1.8 billion.

Vermont

  • Of the 2,778 bridges in the state, 66, or 2.4%, are classified as structurally deficient. This is down from 132 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • Three of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 176 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 1,198 bridges at an estimated cost of $561.2 million.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


Middle Atlantic

The Middle Atlantic Region Produced 57.8 Million Metric Tons of Total Aggregates, a 2.8% Year-Over-Year Increase.

The Middle Atlantic region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the Middle Atlantic region produced 57.8 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 2.8% increase versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 27.4 Mt, an increase of 14.3% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Middle Atlantic region was 44.3 Mt, an increase of 2.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 versus the prior-year period was:

  • New Jersey: 4.9 Mt, a decrease of 6.3%.
  • New York: 11.8 Mt, a decrease of 2.2%.
  • Pennsylvania: 27.5 Mt, an increase of 6.1%.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Middle Atlantic region was 13.6 Mt, an increase of 4.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 versus the prior-year period was:

  • New Jersey: 3.1 Mt, an increase of 8.0%.
  • New York: 7.9 Mt, an increase of 2.8% .
  • Pennsylvania: 2.4 Mt, an increase of 4.8%.

Construction Impact*

  • In New Jersey, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 165,400, an increase of 5.8% from July 2018, but 7% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $23.1 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $625 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $11.7 billion in New Jersey. Private nonresidential spending in New Jersey totaled $6.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $4.8 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in New Jersey totaled $7.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In New York, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 406,500, an increase of 1.9% from July 2018, but 1% less than the state’s peak in March 2019. Construction contributed $51.3 billion (3.1%) of the state’s GDP of $1.7 trillion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in he United States, including $30 billion in New York. Private nonresidential spending in New York totaled $26.9 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $20.1 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in New York totaled $28.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Pennsylvania, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 262,900, an increase of 3.0% from July 2018, but 1% less than the state’s peak in January 2007. Construction contributed $33.1 billion (4.2%) of the state’s GDP of $789 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the U.S., including $17.5 billion in Pennsylvania. Private nonresidential spending in Pennsylvania totaled $8 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $7.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Pennsylvania totaled $14.1 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

New Jersey

  • Of the 6,746 bridges in the state, 544, or 8.1%, are classified as structurally deficient.

New York

  • Of the 17,521 bridges in the state, 1,757, or 10.0%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Pennsylvania

  • Of the 22,737 bridges in the Commonwealth, 3,770, or 16.6%, are classified as structurally deficient. 

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


East North Central

The East North Central Region Produced 90.6 Million Metric Tons of Total Aggregates, a 1% Year-Over-Year Decrease.

The East North Central region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the East North Central region produced 90.6 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 1% decrease versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 39.7 Mt, a 2.2% increase versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the East North Central region was 57 Mt, a decrease of 1.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 versus the prior-year period was:

  • Illinois: 13.6 Mt, a decrease of 3.2%.
  • Indiana: 13.4 Mt, an increase of 0.4%.
  • Michigan: 6.9 Mt, a decrease of 2.7%.
  • Ohio: 16.8 Mt, a decrease of 0.3%.
  • Wisconsin: 6.3 Mt, a decrease of 1.1%.

Sand and gravel production in the East North Central was 33.6 Mt in the second quarter of 2019, a decrease of 0.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 versus the prior-year period was:

  • Illinois: 5 Mt, a decrease of 9.7%.
  • Indiana: 5.6 Mt, an increase of 11.8%.
  • Michigan: 13.9 Mt, a decrease of 1.4%.
  • Ohio: 8.9 Mt, a decrease of 0.3%.
  • Wisconsin: Data unreported for the second quarter of 2019.

Construction Impact

  • In Illinois, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 225,800, a decrease of 0.4% from July 2018, and 20% less than the state’s peak in December 2001. Construction contributed $29.2 billion (3.4%) of the state’s GDP of $865 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $16.8 billion in Illinois. Private nonresidential spending in Illinois totaled $8.7 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $9.1 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Illinois totaled $12.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Indiana, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 148,500, an increase of 5.5% from July 2018, but 4% less than the state’s peak in March 2000. Construction contributed $13.9 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $367 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $427 billion in the United States, including $8.1 billion in Indiana. Private nonresidential spending in Indiana totaled $5.7 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Indiana totaled $8.3 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Michigan, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 172,900, an increase of 1.3% from July 2018, but 19% less than the state’s peak in April 2000. Construction contributed $21.4 billion (4.1%) of the state’s GDP of $528 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $10.8 billion in Michigan. Private nonresidential spending in Michigan totaled $7.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $5.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Michigan totaled $11.1 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Ohio, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 217,200, a decrease of 1.3% from July 2018, and 14% less than the state’s peak in March 2000. Construction contributed $24.9 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $676 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $14 billion in Ohio. Private nonresidential spending in Ohio totaled $8.2 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $8.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Ohio totaled $16.8 billion in 2019, according to ConstructConnect.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey and Associated General Contractors of America. Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.


West North Central

The West North Central Region Produced 78.4 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 18.1% Year-Over-Year Increase.

The West North Central region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the West North Central region produced 78.4 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, an 18.1% increase versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 24.7 Mt, an increase of 0.9% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the West North Central was 44.2 Mt, an increase of 13.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Iowa: 13.7 Mt, an increase of 18.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Kansas: 4.5 Mt, an increase of 0.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Minnesota: 2.7 Mt, an increase of 21.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Missouri: 18.7 Mt, an increase of 12.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Nebraska: 2.9 Mt, an increase of 43.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • North Dakota: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • South Dakota: 1.5 Mt, a decrease of 10.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the West North Central was 34.2 Mt, an increase of 24.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Iowa: 4.3 Mt, an increase of 5.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Kansas: 7.6 Mt, an increase of 142.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Minnesota: 14.2 Mt, an increase of 29.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Missouri: 2.7 Mt, an increase of 12.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Nebraska: State not included in quarterly survey
  • North Dakota: 2.3 Mt, a decrease of 45.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • South Dakota: 2.9 Mt, an increase of 14.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact*

  • In Iowa, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 79,000, an increase of 1.3% from July 2018, but 5% less than the state’s peak in March 2016. Construction contributed $7.8 billion (4.1%) of the state’s GDP of $190 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $4.5 billion in Iowa. Private nonresidential spending in Iowa totaled $4.8 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Iowa totaled $5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Kansas, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 62,400, an increase of 2% from July 2018, but 6% less than the state’s peak in September 2000. Construction contributed $6.3 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $167 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $3.5 billion in Kansas. Private nonresidential spending in Kansas totaled $3 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Kansas totaled $5.3 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Minnesota, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 131,100, an increase of 6.6% from July 2018, but 1% less than the state’s peak in February 2006. Construction contributed $14.6 billion (4.0%) of the state’s GDP of $368 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $8.4 billion in Minnesota. Private nonresidential spending in Minnesota totaled $4.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $6.5 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Minnesota totaled $8.6 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Missouri, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 122,000, a decrease of 1.0% from July 2018, and 19% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $11.6 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $318 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the U.S., including $7.6 billion in Missouri. Private nonresidential spending in Missouri totaled $5.2 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.8 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Missouri totaled $7.7 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Nebraska, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 53,800, an increase of 2.7% from July 2018, a record high. Construction contributed $840 billion (4.1%). Construction contributed $3.3 billion (2.7%) of the state’s GDP of $123 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.8 billion in Nebraska. Private nonresidential spending in Nebraska totaled $2.1 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.8 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Nebraska totaled $2.7 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect
  • In North Dakota, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 28,800, an increase of 11.6% from July 2018, but 23% less than the state’s peak in January 2015. Construction contributed $3.2 billion (5.8%) of the state’s GDP of $54.7 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.7 billion in North Dakota. Private nonresidential spending in North Dakota totaled $1.6 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in North Dakota totaled $3.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In South Dakota, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 23,600, an increase of 3.5% from July 2018, but 2% less than the state’s peak in July 2016. Construction contributed $2 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $51.6 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.1 billion in South Dakota. Private nonresidential spending in South Dakota totaled $1.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in South Dakota totaled $1.6 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Iowa

  • Of the 24,123 bridges in the state, 4,675, or 19.4%, are classified as structurally deficient. 
  • Seven of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 4,815 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

Kansas

  • Of the 24,906 bridges in the state, 1,288, or 5.2%, are classified as structurally deficient. 
  • Six of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 6,773 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

Minnesota

  • Of the 13,358 bridges in the state, 668, or 5.0%, are classified as structurally deficient. 
  • 19 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 1,345 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

Missouri

  • Of the 24,512 bridges in the state, 2,116, or 8.6%, are classified as structurally deficient.
  • Two of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 4,609 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

Nebraska

  • Of the 15,349 bridges in the state, 1,358, or 8.8%, are classified as structurally deficient. 
  • Two of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 3,742 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

North Dakota

  • Of the 4,355 bridges in the state, 469, or 10.8%, are classified as structurally deficient. 
  • Two of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 890 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

South Dakota

  • Of the 5,824 bridges in the state, 973, or 16.7%, are classified as structurally deficient.
  • Four of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 1,120 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


South Atlantic

The South Atlantic Region Produced 118 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 10.6% Year-Over-Year Increase.

The South Atlantic region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the South Atlantic region produced 118 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 10.6% increase versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 94.6 Mt, an increase of 22.4% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the South Atlantic region was 99.2 Mt, an increase of 12.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Delaware: Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
  • Florida: 23.2 Mt, an increase of 14.0% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Georgia: 16.7 Mt, an increase of 13.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Maryland: 9.3 Mt, an increase of 29.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • North Carolina: 18.5 Mt, an increase of 5.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • South Carolina: 8.1 Mt, an increase of 0.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Virginia: 16.4 Mt, an increase of 9.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • West Virginia: 6.6 Mt, an increase of 29.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the South Atlantic region was 19 Mt, an increase of 3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Delaware: 962,000 metric tons, a decrease of 2.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Florida: 5.9 Mt, a decrease of 7.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Georgia: 1.8 Mt, an increase of 28.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Maryland: 2.3 Mt, an increase of 19.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • North Carolina: 2.9 Mt, an increase of 5.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • South Carolina: 2.8 Mt, an increase of 3.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Virginia: 2.1 Mt, an increase of 0.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • West Virginia: Data unreported for the second quarter of 2019.

Construction Impact*

  • In Delaware, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 23,100, an increase of 4.1% from July 2018, but 22% less than the state’s peak in November 2005. Construction contributed $2.8 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $75 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.4 billion in Delaware. Private nonresidential spending in Delaware totaled $822 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $884 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Delaware totaled $1.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Florida, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 563,800, an increase of 3.9% from July 2018, but 18% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $55.7 billion (5.4%) of the state’s GDP of $1.0 trillion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $29 billion in Florida. Private nonresidential spending in Florida totaled $16.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $12.7 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Florida totaled $28.7 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Georgia, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 208,800, an increase of 6.3% from July 2018, but 7% less than the state’s peak in March 2007. Construction contributed $25.3 billion (4.3%) of the state’s GDP of $588 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $12.5 billion in Georgia. Private nonresidential spending in Georgia totaled $9.1 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $6.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Georgia totaled $12 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Maryland, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 160,900, a decrease of 1.4% from July 2018, and 16% less than the state’s peak in March 2006. Construction contributed $17.8 billion (4.3%) of the state’s GDP of $413 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $11.2 billion in Maryland. Private nonresidential spending in Maryland totaled $3.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $5.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Maryland totaled $7.6 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In North Carolina, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 220,100, a decrease of 0.1% from July 2018, and 14% less than the state’s peak in March 2007. Construction contributed $21.7 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $566 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $12.4 billion in North Carolina. Private nonresidential spending in North Carolina totaled $9.3 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $6.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in North Carolina totaled $14.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In South Carolina, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 100,100, a decrease of 2.7% from July 2018, and 22% less than the state’s peak in October 2006. Construction contributed $11.6 billion (5.0%) of the state’s GDP of $230 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $5.7 billion in South Carolina. Private nonresidential spending in South Carolina totaled $5.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $4.7 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in South Carolina totaled $6.4 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect
  • In Virginia, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 201,900, an increase of 1.6% from July 2018, but 20% less than the state’s peak in March 2006. Construction contributed $21.3 billion (4.0%) of the state’s GDP of $535 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $11.9 billion in Virginia. Private nonresidential spending in Virginia totaled $6.9 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $5.9 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Virginia totaled $17.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In West Virginia, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 47,900, an increase of 11.7% from July 2018, but 6% less than the state’s peak in January 2019. Construction contributed $4.5 billion (5.8%) of the state’s GDP of $77.5 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $3 billion in West Virginia. Private nonresidential spending in West Virginia totaled $270 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in West Virginia totaled $7.4 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Delaware

  • Of the 863 bridges in the state, 34, or 3.9%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Florida

  • Of the 12,435 bridges in the state, 328, or 2.6%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Georgia

  • Of the 14,879 bridges in the state, 494, or 3.3%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Maryland

  • Of the 5,357 bridges in the state, 274, or 5.1%, are classified as structurally deficient

North Carolina

  • Of the 18,377 bridges in the state, 1,871, or 10.2%, are classified as structurally deficient.

South Carolina

  • Of the 9,401 bridges in the state, 795, or 8.5%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Virginia

  • Of the 13,931 bridges in the state, 646, or 4.6%, are classified as structurally deficient.

West Virginia

  • Of the 7,269 bridges in the state, 1,444, or 19.9%, are classified as structurally deficient.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


East South Central

The East South Central Region Produced 49.4 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 6.4% Year-Over-Year Increase.

The East South Central region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the East South Central region produced 49.4 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 6.4% increase versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 35.6 Mt, a 24.7% increase versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the East South Central region was 40.9 Mt, an increase of 7% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Alabama: 12.5 Mt, an increase of 20% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Kentucky: 13.5 Mt, an increase of 4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Mississippi: 606,000 metric tons, a decrease of 7.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Tennessee: 14.3 Mt, an increase of 0.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the East South Central region was 8.5 Mt, an increase of 3.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Alabama: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • Kentucky: 2.8 Mt, an increase of 8.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Mississippi: 3.4 Mt, an increase of 8.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Tennessee: 2.2 Mt, a decrease of 7.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact

  • In Alabama, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 94,100, an increase of 5.1% from July 2018, but 17% less than the state’s peak in October 2007. Construction contributed $7.9 billion (3.6%) of the state’s GDP of $221 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $4.9 billion in Alabama. Private nonresidential spending in Alabama totaled $2.8 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.8 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Alabama totaled $5.8 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Kentucky, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 79,900, an increase of 2.4% from July 2018, but 12% less than the state’s peak in March 2000. Construction contributed $8.5 billion (4.1%) of the state’s GDP of $208 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $4.3 billion in Kentucky. Private nonresidential spending in Kentucky totaled $4.2 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.5 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Kentucky totaled $6.3 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Mississippi, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 44,400, an increase of 1.6% from July 2018, but 30% less than the state’s peak in April 2008. Construction contributed $4.2 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $114 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.3 billion in Mississippi. Private nonresidential spending in Mississippi totaled $677 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Mississippi totaled $2.2 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Tennessee, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 127,300, an increase of 2.1% from July 2018, but 5% less than the state’s peak in January 2008. Construction contributed $14.2 billion (3.9%) of the state’s GDP of $366 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $7.4 billion in Tennessee. Private nonresidential spending in Tennessee totaled $5.7 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Tennessee totaled $8.8 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey and Associated General Contractors of America. Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.


West South Central

The West South Central Region Produced 100 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 0.2% Year-Over-Year Decrease.

The West South Central region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the West South Central region produced 100 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 0.2% decrease versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 91.8 Mt, an increase of 8% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the West South Central region was 64.5 Mt, a decrease of 1.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Arkansas: 6.7 Mt, a decrease of 8.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Louisiana: Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
  • Oklahoma: 10.5 Mt, an increase of 5.7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Texas: 46.7 Mt, a decrease of 1.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the West South Central region was 35.6 Mt, an increase of 2.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Arkansas: 1.5 Mt, a decrease of 20.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Louisiana: 2.6 Mt, a decrease of 29.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Oklahoma: 2.9 Mt, an increase of 12% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Texas: 28.4 Mt, an increase of 7.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact*

  • In Arkansas, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 53,000, an increase of 4.7% from July 2018, but 8% less than the state’s peak in February 2006. Construction contributed $4.7 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $128 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.5 billion in Arkansas. Private nonresidential spending in Arkansas totaled $2 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Arkansas totaled $3.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Louisiana, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 140,400, a decrease of 7.9% from July 2018, and 8% less than the state’s peak in June 2018. Construction contributed $13.7 billion (5.4%) of the state’s GDP of $252 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $10.1 billion in Louisiana. Private nonresidential spending in Louisiana totaled $14.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.9 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Louisiana totaled $4.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect
  • In Oklahoma, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 85,900, an increase of 7.6% from July 2018, a record high. Construction contributed $7.3 billion (3.6%) of the state’s GDP of $200 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $4.4 billion in Oklahoma. Private nonresidential spending in Oklahoma totaled $3.7 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.9 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Oklahoma totaled $5.8 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Texas, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 786,500, an increase of 6.6% from July 2018, a record high. Construction contributed $94.2 billion (5.3%) of the state’s GDP of $1.8 trillion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $49.4 billion in Texas. Private nonresidential spending in Texas totaled $44.7 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $30.8 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Texas totaled $53.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Arkansas

  • Of the 12,892 bridges in the state, 588, or 4.6%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is down from 607 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 23 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 1,515 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 2,638 bridges at an estimated cost of $1.3 billion. This compares to 2,832 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Louisiana

  • Of the 12,899 bridges in the state, 1,678, or 13.0%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is up from 1,609 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 46 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 2,083 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 3,347 bridges at an estimated cost of $7.5 billion. This compares to 3,411 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Oklahoma

  • Of the 23,116 bridges in the state, 2,540, or 11.0%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is down from 3,440 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 30 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 3,863 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 21,454 bridges at an estimated cost of $8.2 billion. This compares to 22,393 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Texas

  • Of the 54,131 bridges in the state, 695, or 1.3%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is down from 812 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 38 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 2,763 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 11,987 bridges at an estimated cost of $3.3 billion. This compares to 12,783 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


Mountain

The Mountain Region Produced 76.4 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 5.2% Year-Over-Year Increase.

The Mountain region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the Mountain region produced 76.4 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 5.2% increase versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 46.1 Mt, a decrease of 0.4% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of aggregates in the second quarter of 2019 was:

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Mountain region was 19.6 Mt, and increase 15.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Arizona: 4.0 Mt, an increase of 19.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Colorado: 4.4 Mt, an increase of 11.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Idaho: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • Montana: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • Nevada: 4.2 Mt, an increase of 49% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • New Mexico: 1.2 Mt, a decrease of 0.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Utah: 2.8 Mt, a decrease of 3.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Wyoming: 2.9 Mt, an increase of 8.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Mountain region was 56.8 Mt, an increase of 2.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Arizona: 16.0 Mt, an increase of 10.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Colorado: 9.0 Mt, a decrease of 6.6% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Idaho: 8.4 Mt, an increase of 7% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Montana: 4.0 Mt, an increase of 6.5% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Nevada: 6.3 Mt, an increase of 6.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • New Mexico: 2.3 Mt, a decrease of 20% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Utah: 7.6 Mt, a decrease of 8.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Wyoming: 3.0 Mt, an increase of 13.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact*

  • In Arizona, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 175,700, an increase of 11.0% from July 2018, but 28% less than the state’s peak in June 2006. Construction contributed $16.7 billion (4.8%) of the state’s GDP of $347 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $9.2 billion in Arizona. Private nonresidential spending in Arizona totaled $4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $4.1 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Arizona totaled $9.4 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Colorado, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 174,500, an increase of 0.5% from July 2018, but 0.2% less than the state’s peak in June 2019. Construction contributed $21.3 billion (5.8%) of the state’s GDP of $369 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $11.1 billion in Colorado. Private nonresidential spending in Colorado totaled $7.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $6.5 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Colorado totaled $8.4 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Idaho, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 50,200, an increase of 1.4% from July 2018, but 6% less than the state’s peak in June 2006. Construction contributed $5.1 billion (6.7%) of the state’s GDP of $77 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.1 billion in Idaho. Private nonresidential spending in Idaho totaled $1.3 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.1 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Idaho totaled $1.9 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Montana, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 29,300, an increase of 1.7% from July 2018, but 11% less than the state’s peak in June 2007. Construction contributed $2.9 billion (5.9%) of the state’s GDP of $49 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.5 billion in Montana. Private nonresidential spending in Montana totaled $845 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.1 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Montana totaled $1.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In New Mexico, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 50,600, an increase of 8.4% from July 2018, but 15% less than the state’s peak in June 2006. In New Mexico, construction contributed $3.8 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $99.4 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.4 billion in New Mexico. Private nonresidential spending in New Mexico totaled $1.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in New Mexico totaled $2.1 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Nevada, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 97,400, an increase of 8.8% from July 2018, but 33% less than the state’s peak in April 2006. Construction contributed $8.5 billion (5.1%) of the state’s GDP of $166 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $5.6 billion in Nevada. Private nonresidential spending in Nevada totaled $4.9 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.2 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Nevada totaled $5.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect
  • In Utah, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 109,300, an increase of 4.6% from July 2018, a record high. Construction contributed $11.1 billion (6.3%) of the state’s GDP of $177 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $5.5 billion in Utah. Private nonresidential spending in Utah totaled $2.5 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Utah totaled $6.3 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Wyoming, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 22,400, an increase of 13.1% from July 2018, but 22% less than the state’s peak in February 2008. construction contributed $2.1 billion (5.3%) of the state’s GDP of $39.4 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.1 billion in Wyoming. Private nonresidential spending in Wyoming totaled $494 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $930 million. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Wyoming totaled $1.1 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Arizona

  • Of the 8,294 bridges in the state, 150, or 1.8%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Colorado

  • Of the 8,786 bridges in the state, 473, or 5.4%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Idaho

  • Of the 4,482 bridges in the state, 315, or 7.0%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Montana

  • Of the 5,265 bridges in the state, 390, or 7.4%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

New Mexico

  • Of the 4,010 bridges in the state, 232, or 5.8%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Nevada

  • Of the 1,979 bridges in the state, 27, or 1.4%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Utah

  • Of the 3,061 bridges in the state, 66, or 2.2%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Wyoming

  • Of the 3,129 bridges in the state, 257, or 8.2%, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.


Pacific

The Pacific Region Produced 69.3 Mt of Total Aggregates, a 6.7% Year-Over-Year Decrease.

The Pacific region as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) consists of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington.

In the second quarter of 2019, the most recent report available from the USGS, the Pacific region produced 69.3 million metric tons (Mt) of total aggregates, a 6.7% decrease versus the second quarter of 2018.

That followed first-quarter production of 43.3 Mt, a decrease of 15.3% versus the first quarter of 2018.

Crushed stone production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Pacific region was 23 Mt, a decrease of 13.2% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of crushed stone in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Alaska: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • California: 9.7 Mt, a decrease of 25.8% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Hawaii: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • Oregon: 6.2 Mt, an increase of 2.4% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Washington: 6.9 Mt, a decrease of 3.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Sand and gravel production in the second quarter of 2019 in the Pacific region was 46.3 Mt, a decrease of 3% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Individual state production of sand and gravel in the second quarter of 2019 was:

  • Alaska: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • California: 28.4 Mt, a decrease of 6.3% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Hawaii: State not included in quarterly survey.
  • Oregon: 4.5 Mt, an increase of 10.9% versus the second quarter of 2018.
  • Washington: 13.4 Mt, an increase of 0.1% versus the second quarter of 2018.

Construction Impact*

  • In Alaska, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 16,700, an increase of 7.7% from July 2018, but 14% less than the state’s peak in April 2005. Construction contributed $2 billion (3.7%) of the state’s GDP of $54 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $1.3 billion in Alaska. Private nonresidential spending in Alaska totaled $232 million in 2018. State and local spending totaled $1.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Alaska totaled $1.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In California, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 900,700, an increase of 4.3% from July 2018, but 5% less than the state’s peak in June 2006. Construction contributed $111 billion (3.8%) of the state’s GDP of $3 trillion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $62.3 billion in California. Private nonresidential spending in California totaled $30.1 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $30.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in California totaled $43 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Hawaii, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 36,700, an increase of 1.9% from July 2018, but 7% less than the state’s peak in December 2007. Construction contributed $5.2 billion (5.7%) of the state’s GDP of $92 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $2.8 billion in Hawaii. Private nonresidential spending in Hawaii totaled $1.4 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $2.3 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Hawaii totaled $2.4 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Oregon, construction employment in July 2019 totaled 111,000, an increase of 5.4% from July 2018, a record high. Construction contributed $840 billion (4.1%). In Oregon, construction contributed $11.1 billion (4.6%) of the state’s GDP of $239 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $6.5 billion in Oregon. Private nonresidential spending in Oregon totaled $3.8 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $3.7 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Oregon totaled $6.1 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.
  • In Washington, Construction employment in July 2019 totaled 223,800, an increase of 4.9% from July 2018, a record high. Construction unemployment is near a series low. Construction contributed $24.3 billion (4.3%) of the state’s GDP of $563 billion. Construction wages and salaries in 2018 totaled $468 billion in the United States, including $14.1 billion in Washington. Private nonresidential spending in Washington totaled $7.6 billion in 2018. State and local spending totaled $10.4 billion. Nonresidential (building and heavy/civil) starts in Washington totaled $12.5 billion in 2018, according to ConstructConnect.

* Totals are not available for residential or federal construction spending.

National Bridge Inventory

Alaska

  • Of the 1,592 bridges in the state, 155, or 9.7 %, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is up from 150 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 12 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 144 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 306 bridges at an estimated cost of $148.7 million. This compares to 315 bridges that needed work in 2014.

California

  • Of the 25,737 bridges in the state, 1,812, or 7.0 %, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is down from 2,388 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 150 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 561 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 5,093 bridges at an estimated cost of $8.8 billion. This compares to 5,512 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Hawaii

  • Of the 1,137 bridges in the state, 78, or 6.9 %, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is up from 59 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • Three of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 170 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 1,110 bridges at an estimated cost of $8.5 billion. This compares to 1,112 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Oregon

  • Of the 8,161 bridges in the state, 422, or 5.2 %, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is up from 403 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • Six of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 432 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 2,007 bridges at an estimated cost of $1.8 billion. This compares to 1,941 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Washington

  • Of the 8,278 bridges in the state, 382, or 4.6 %, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition. This is up from 353 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2014.
  • 42 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System.
  • 562 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 6,080 bridges at an estimated cost of $9.2 billion. This compares to 5,851 bridges that needed work in 2014.

Sources: U.S. Geological Survey, Associated General Contractors of America and American Road & Transportation Builders Association.