Rock Products - The Leading Voice of the Aggregate Industries.
  • MINExpo Revisited

    MINExpo Revisited

    The World’s Largest Mining Show Had Something for Everyone, Aggregates Producers Included. By Mark S. Kuhar Read More
  • Handling Harsh Conditions

    Handling Harsh Conditions

    C&E Concrete’s Articulated Haulers Key to Production at Rock Dust Operation. By Mark S. Kuhar Read More
  • Pitfalls at the Pit

    Pitfalls at the Pit

    Here Are Seven Common Things You Should NOT Do When Problem Solving. By Ryan Brown Read More
  • Material Handling Roundup

    Material Handling Roundup

    Updates, Innovations and Improvements to Keep Aggregates Producers Moving Material Effectively. By Mark S. Kuhar Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

Rock From The Road: Blog & Travelogue

Dec. 7, 2016 – With more than 15 organizations pledging support, the Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention initiated plans to shine a light on creating a zero-suicide industry. The...
Read All

Prime-Time Products

Hardface Technologies (by Postle Industries) introduced two austenitic manganese hard surfacing wires. Postalloy 2865-FCO is a flux-cored open-arc wire that deposits a fully austenitic alloy with a much higher chromium...
Read All

Manufacturers in Focus

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) honored CNH Industrial with its Pillar of the Industry Award, recognizing the company’s work to improve the business environment for the equipment manufacturing industry...
Read All

People on the Move

Chaney Enterprises announced the promotion of Francis H. (Hall) Chaney III, to president. Previously executive vice president, Chaney assumes responsibility for all aspects of the Gambrills, Md.-based concrete manufacturer, aggregate...
Read All

Rock Stars

Deister Machine Co. Inc., announced that co-owner and chairman Irwin F. Deister Jr., recently celebrated 65 years of service to the family-owned company, which was founded in 1912 and is...
Read All

Resource Center

Study: Methane Leakage from Shale Gas Lower Than Alleged


Initial findings from a new comprehensive study undertaken by the Environmental Defense Fund and the University of Texas found that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below estimates of previous studies.

In 2011, a study released from Cornell University led by ecologist Robert Howarth purported to show high levels of methane “leakage” from natural gas systems, including wells that had been hydraulically fractured. The Howarth study indicated that as much as 7.9 percent of natural gas developed from shale was leaking into the atmosphere thus negating its carbon-friendly advantages.

Studies since the release of the Howarth report have all tended to dispute or outwardly challenge the findings contained in the report. However, initial findings from the new study should leave little doubt.
The first part of the EDF study confirms the consensus reached by most scientists that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below the estimates provided in the Howarth report. The study reviewed emissions associated with well development, production, and completions and found leakage of methane fell below estimates made by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The agency's most recent data found that overall leakage from the natural gas production process was actually below 1.5 percent.

Using their own writings, critics of the use of natural gas have claimed that leakage rates must fall below 2 to 3 percent in order to obtain any benefit from the use of natural gas. This report simply confirms USEPA's findings of leakage rates well below those found in the Howarth study and even below the thresholds set forth by critics of the natural gas industry.