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    Going That Extra Mile

    Allegheny Mineral’s Slippery Rock Quarry Installs a Mile-Long Overland Conveyor at its New Operation. Read More
  • Doing Away With Dust

    Doing Away With Dust

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  • Low-Water Washing

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    A New Economical Solution to Efficient Crusher Fines Management. Read More
  • Understanding the ELD Mandate

    Understanding the ELD Mandate

    The Electronic Logging Device Mandate is Drawing Near. Here’s What You Need to Know. Read More
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Rock From The Road: Blog & Travelogue

August 10, 2017 – The National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association (NSSGA) will hold its first Legislative Policy Forum in Washington, D.C., Sept. 24-28. It will be held at the...
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Prime-Time Products

Superior Industries Inc. has added a new Speed Sensor to its conveyor component accessories offering. The Speed Sensor monitors the speed of a conveyor belt by producing electronic pulses interpreted...
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Manufacturers in Focus

Victaulic recently relaunched its website at victaulic.com, completely retooled to deliver an enhanced user experience from any device and from any location worldwide, according to the company.
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People on the Move

Natural Resource Partners (NRP) announced that Wyatt L. Hogan, NRP's president and chief operating officer, resigned effective Aug. 8. Craig W. Nunez, NRP's chief financial officer and treasurer, will succeed...
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Rock Stars

ASTM International’s Committee on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates (C09) presented its top annual award – the Award of Merit – to Robin E. Graves, corporate manager of technical services for...
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Resource Center

Study: Methane Leakage from Shale Gas Lower Than Alleged


Initial findings from a new comprehensive study undertaken by the Environmental Defense Fund and the University of Texas found that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below estimates of previous studies.

In 2011, a study released from Cornell University led by ecologist Robert Howarth purported to show high levels of methane “leakage” from natural gas systems, including wells that had been hydraulically fractured. The Howarth study indicated that as much as 7.9 percent of natural gas developed from shale was leaking into the atmosphere thus negating its carbon-friendly advantages.

Studies since the release of the Howarth report have all tended to dispute or outwardly challenge the findings contained in the report. However, initial findings from the new study should leave little doubt.
The first part of the EDF study confirms the consensus reached by most scientists that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below the estimates provided in the Howarth report. The study reviewed emissions associated with well development, production, and completions and found leakage of methane fell below estimates made by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The agency's most recent data found that overall leakage from the natural gas production process was actually below 1.5 percent.

Using their own writings, critics of the use of natural gas have claimed that leakage rates must fall below 2 to 3 percent in order to obtain any benefit from the use of natural gas. This report simply confirms USEPA's findings of leakage rates well below those found in the Howarth study and even below the thresholds set forth by critics of the natural gas industry.