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Rock From The Road: Blog & Travelogue

May 1, 2018 – Rock Products would like to know a little bit more about energy needs at your aggregates operation. If you take our quick 10-Minute Survey, you will...

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The Volvo A45G full-suspension articulated hauler is purpose-built to deliver reliability and performance that is second to none, according to the company. When working in tough terrain, the A45G FS...

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Tires can be critical to the success of mining, construction, quarry and port operations, and they can represent a significant investment for businesses in those sectors.
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Manufacturers in Focus

With six months left before the midterm elections, the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) is hitting the road to educate and engage manufacturing voters about the policies that are critical...
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People on the Move

Telsmith Inc., has hired Dave Noggle, who joins the company as regional sales manager covering Utah, Nevada, Idaho, Arizona and Wyoming.
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Rock Stars

Megan Tanel, senior vice president exhibitions and events of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), has earned Industry Icon honors from the Trade Show News Network (TSNN).
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Volvo Construction Equipment’s (Volvo CE) North American dealer network has seen a number of changes over the last year. Dealerships have changed hands, territories have expanded and new players have emerged on the scene to sell the company’s premium equipment...
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Resource Center

 

Study: Methane Leakage from Shale Gas Lower Than Alleged


Initial findings from a new comprehensive study undertaken by the Environmental Defense Fund and the University of Texas found that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below estimates of previous studies.

In 2011, a study released from Cornell University led by ecologist Robert Howarth purported to show high levels of methane “leakage” from natural gas systems, including wells that had been hydraulically fractured. The Howarth study indicated that as much as 7.9 percent of natural gas developed from shale was leaking into the atmosphere thus negating its carbon-friendly advantages.

Studies since the release of the Howarth report have all tended to dispute or outwardly challenge the findings contained in the report. However, initial findings from the new study should leave little doubt.
The first part of the EDF study confirms the consensus reached by most scientists that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below the estimates provided in the Howarth report. The study reviewed emissions associated with well development, production, and completions and found leakage of methane fell below estimates made by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The agency's most recent data found that overall leakage from the natural gas production process was actually below 1.5 percent.

Using their own writings, critics of the use of natural gas have claimed that leakage rates must fall below 2 to 3 percent in order to obtain any benefit from the use of natural gas. This report simply confirms USEPA's findings of leakage rates well below those found in the Howarth study and even below the thresholds set forth by critics of the natural gas industry.